YOUR BRAIN and YOU

If you’re like most people you perceive your brain as a fixed genetic inheritance.  It’s just part of who you are.  You accept it for what it is, and you try to make the best of what you’ve inherited.

Forget all that!  YOUR BRAIN IS NOT FIXED.  Genetics gets you started, but your brain is malleable constantly changing in response to what you do and don’t do.  It’s called brain plasticity or neuroplasticity.

Your brain is a living, functioning, physical structure, and like all living things it functions to survive.  To survive your brain must know about its environment.  Knowing about its environment requires the your brain to interpret, and respond to the  information it receives.  That makes your brain the control center of your “Brain, Mind, Body System”.

Your Mind functions as the intermediary between your brain and its environment.  It’s your vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch and feel that provides your brain with information about your environment.

Your Sub-conscious Mind is your emotional system and functions as your brain’s bodyguard, protecting it from harm, helping to ensure survival.   The information collected by your Conscious Mind is transmitted to your Sub-conscious Mind where it’s analyzed for a safe behavioral response. 

Blood is your brain’s primary resource.  It’s the blood that your brain draws that keeps it healthy and functioning effectively.  Your brain draws blood when it processes information.  It’s what you do formally and informally that provides your brain with information.  What you do and don’t do determines how much, or how little, blood your brain will draw.

When you receive new or strengthening information it must be processed.  When your brain processes information it draws blood.    Since it’s blood that keeps your brain nourished, healthy and functioning effectively, you need to continue to draw blood by learning, formally or informally.   

Blood going to the brain diminishes when it’s used to support activities and efforts that you’re no longer involved in.  To maintain the same amount of blood going to the brain you have to replace efforts and activities you’re no longer involved in with something new.